The Importance of Play for Later Success

The Importance of Play for Later Success

Samantha Jonas-Rongo

play

As children grow, play is an important factor for their development. They gain knowledge and skills benefitting not only their current life, but they also build a foundation for further success as an adult. Every time a child plays, they learn more about the world surrounding them and how to manage situations along with dealing with others. Play is fun for children and without them realizing, they are learning and beginning their education on life.

The stages of play vary, each style and effect. It is the work of childhood, in a laboratory in which they make developments, figure out how the world works, who they are and who they might be. Play is essential to development because it contributes to the cognitive, physical, social, and emotional well-being of children to help prosper. As children grow and change, play develops with them according to a developmental sequence as they age.

Communication also plays a key role in the success of any workplace program or policy, and is gained starting while interacting with others at a young age, normally during play. The type of work that is on the rise and still earns a decent living is work that involves not only uniquely human skills, as opposed to skills that a computer can copy, but skills that are standardized across humans. Job growth has occurred in those jobs that require creativity and relationships. Over the past several decades, majority of jobs require complex communication and cognitive work or expert thinking.

Importance of Play-way method in Child’s Development

For starters, a reputation for trustworthiness is an important asset in personal living, and in our economy. Developing such a reputation requires the ability to act with responsibility and with a sense of ethics which is related to learning to socialize and communicate with others beginning as children. Success, then, in the type of economy toward which we are moving, and that today’s children will experience, depends upon the capacities of creativity, self-knowledge, social skills, and virtue. Relationships matter not just because the economy is structured by levels of relationships among firms, but because the primary economic assets reside within individuals. Before an innovation becomes marketable, it is an idea that lives within the mind of the innovator. Relationships and interpersonal cooperation are part and parcel of the creative economy.

During early childhood, peer interaction increases as children move from nonsocial activity, such as an unoccupied and/or onlooker, advancing to participate. Parents and/or caregivers influence early peer relations both directly through attempts to influence their child’s peer relations and indirectly through their parent moral practices. Secure attachment, emotionally positive parent-child conversations, and cooperative parent-child play are linked to favorable peer interaction. As the frequency of associative and cooperative play increase, the frequency of non-social activity is constant.

Very young children normally have a limited form of social participation. They play near other children with similar materials, but will most likely not try to influence or interact with other children. This is the parallel play stage, and is in par for the developmental course for babies, even toddlers.

While they may appear to be playing independently, kids this age are actually keeping an eye on each other’s behavior. Eventually, they’ll begin to imitate what he or she sees the others doing, and the peer pressure opens their mind to new possibilities for play. Becoming observant and imitating eventually helps extend vocabulary. Parallel play is often a first step in forming strong social relationships outside of the family.

Developing Core Vocabulary for Each Academic Area

Play is also vital to children’s social development. It enables children to develop a better communicating ground. During play, children increase their verbal and non-verbal communication skills by negotiating roles, and extending their speech, vocabulary and comprehension of the words. By becoming social with others, they exercise their abilities to identify with others as well as themselves. They learn to gain access to their peers’ feelings and appreciating the feelings of others.

Play also supports emotional maturity by providing a way to express and cope with feelings. While they play, they are allowed to think about experienced feelings both pleasant and unpleasant and re-enact the situation to their preference. In addition to expressing feelings, children also learn to cope with their feelings as they act out. For example, how they react to being angry or overwhelmed in response to situations and other people. In play, children learn how to regulate their fear and anger and thereby learn how to maintain emotional control in threatening real-life situations.

Play also contributes to children’s fine and gross motor development and body awareness as they actively use their bodies. Using their bodies during play enables them to feel physically confident, secure and self-assured. It provides various health benefits as well. Physical activity promotes early brain development, and learning in infants and young children. It also decreases the risk of developing health conditions like coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, obesity and many other chronic health conditions.

Most children naturally develop the ability to run and walk. However, they require practice and instruction to develop hopping, galloping, sliding, catching, jumping, throwing, kicking, bouncing and striking skills. Children incorporate these skills into sports, games and dance. Playgrounds are perfect places for a child to develop mental connections, socialize and develop fine and gross motor skills.

Collaborating to Solve Problems

Creative thinking can also be considered an aspect of problem solving which originates in play. When young children use their imaginations, they become more creative, perform better at school task, and develop a problem solving approach to learning. It allows a new response and awareness of new connections. Children create their own version of transformation of information including music, arts & crafts and audio-visual.

Symbolic play is an often-overlooked important scaffold to emerging literacy. The appearance of symbolic play is considered one of the most significant cognitive developments of a young child. Symbolic play, along with deferred imitation and language; signals the development of representational thought and allows gradual exploration and control. The key importance of representational thought is that the child is now able to represent objects and events symbolically. Symbolic representation shows you how sophisticated their brain is becoming. It also allows them to prepare for, or work through future events and situations, and build relationships with others.

The industrial age was a time in which first manual, and then routine cognitive skills were emphasized. We have found that the work of both of these skill categories can be replicated by machines. Today, more Americans are employed in the arts, entertainment and designed industries than are employed as lawyers, accountants and auditors. Our economy also has more writers and artist than ever before. Due to how they will be plying their own human assets in their entrepreneurial endeavors, today’s children will need to know how to make full use of their human assets.

More than thirty percent of the work force belongs to the “creative class”, a group of people whose primary occupation involves creativity-based human capital whose numbers now suppress those of the working class. Primary assets that creative economy participants use to ply their entrepreneurial talents are those that are uniquely human in nature. In other words, educating the human being is becoming an economic necessity, not simply an alternative lifestyle. Not only is the creative economy more entrepreneurial, but its roots are structured differently.

Technology, of course, encompasses more than just computers and machines. The machines themselves are actually the product of process of technology, which represents the ability to create a tangible product. Technology, is then dependent upon human cognitive capacities as are talent and tolerance. Computer programming, work that we use to consider white-collar and highly skilled, is increasingly diminishing. In almost all cases these types of jobs are learning economies like ours, because the forms of careers that are expanding, relay on routine cognitive skills.

The fact of the matter is, healthy play offers the ability to evolve into healthy success.                                                                                                                                 

Samantha Jonas-Rongo

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